“Exerciser’s Block”

Writer’s block is a term that wasn’t around until the 1940’s.

Before that, writing wasn’t something usually done for money. It was a hobby. It was done for fun.

A graph that supports my claim, but yet has no “y-axis data” or research reference.

 

With the advent of the internet, blogging,  and mass distribution, writing is now considered a trade. I even know a few people whose income is greatly affected by their writing. When the stakes are high -(bill’s not being paid unless you’re producing good writing) Writer’s Block shows up like a surprise stay from the in-laws.

It happens most when a writer is stressed from attempting to reach deadlines, find syntax perfection or make a paragraph fit “just right” within their story.

People who write for fun, rarely get writer’s block.

The stakes are lowered therefore, they are under less stress regarding their performance when they write. With the fear of error removed, they have the freedom of “flow” or “satori” where they can play a keyboard like Chopin played the piano.

When someone shows up for day 1 of CrossFit, they aren’t worried about getting too bulky or qualifying for the CrossFit Games. They are more concerned with looking silly learning a new move. They don’t want to be the one raising their hand 3 times at the whiteboard to ask “what’s an AMRAP again?”

As experts, we approach fitness as a one-on-one introduction because it creates a better environment for a beginner. Still, people have their reservations.

And that’s ok.

I’m going to an Indian wedding in a couple weeks and will be wearing kurta-pajama, and I am the whitest guy I know.

It will be a little intimidating doing something new in a room full of people who do it as part of their culture, but I know the experience and growth will be worth it. There may even be a rare laugh- but I know it will be someone remembering their first time out of their element, or having a refreshing smile, seeing someone open to other’s customs.

I no longer believe in talent. I have yet in 10 years, to see someone show up and really “get it” on day one. “Getting it” takes a few hiccups, party fouls, and receiving kind feedback, but that’s the nature of learning.

They say that masters of something have 10,000 hours of practice. I’m willing to bet they have over double that number in mistakes.

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